Housing

“Housing is a human right. We’ve got to fight to make that right a reality.”

Build More Affordable Housing and More Market-Rate Housing

  • The Columbus Region will grow by a million people by 2050. In order to meet the growing need for housing across the income ladder, our region needs more housing. Our region especially needs more affordable housing in high-opportunity neighborhoods. Past policies excluded black and working-class residents from certain neighborhoods through practices like redlining, restrictive covenants, and exclusionary zoning. We must be intentional in undoing those past practices to create a city where everyone has a safe place to live. 
  • Cities across the nation are looking at substantial zoning reform that allows for well-designed, mixed-income areas while maintaining neighborhood character. These policies often provide more flexibility to build accessory dwelling units, residential-scale multifamily units, flexible parking requirements, and more. All with the aim to make more housing available for middle-class and working-class families.
  • Columbus took a proactive step towards inclusionary zoning with the residential CRA program that provides a tax break in exchange for below-market units in some neighborhoods. However, Columbus needs to go much further by instituting density bonuses to create more housing for Columbus families.  

Fight Evictions

  • Council President Hardin stood against evictions by helping to fund the Municipal Court Self Help Center, Legal Aid representation of tenants, and 3rd-party mediation for tenants and landlords. 
  • Furthermore, during the COVID-19 crisis, President Hardin voted for more than $16 million dollars to help renters who had lost income stay in their homes.

Create Tools for Permanent Affordability

  • Council President Hardin helped create the Central Ohio Community Land Trust, which allows for working families to build wealth while keeping a home perpetually affordable.
  • Although the Trust only began in 2019, Columbus has built more permanently affordable units in the Land Trust than anywhere else in Ohio.